CST Courses

Undergraduate

  • (BIB112) Bible Study Methodology

    This is a survey of the methods of Bible study. Included as a part of this study are the synthetic, inductive, biographical, historical, theological, and devotional methods. For this course, the inductive study method will be emphasized and will include the steps of observation, interpretation, application, and correlation. Principles in these steps are applied to biblical passages and books.

  • (BIB122) Pentateuch

    Course considers the origin of both the earth and humankind. From Genesis to Deuteronomy, the course will help the student trace the nation of Israel from its beginnings until the time of its entrance into the Promised Land. Included in the course are studies on the Creation theories, the Flood, and the concept of holiness as presented in the book of Leviticus.

  • (BIB132) Historical Books

    This interpretive survey covers the historical books of the Old Testament—the books of Joshua through Esther. They deal with the period of about 1,000 years from the entrance of the nation of Israel into the Promised Land until its return after the Exile. The course especially emphasizes Israel’s messianic mission first described in God’s covenant with Abraham, father of the Hebrew nation. It examines the background, structure, and content of each book to provide an understanding of the times and their relationship to God’s purpose in redeeming the world through Jesus for living, and Jesus Christ and His Church as unifying themes.

  • (BIB142) Synoptic Gospels

    This course explores Matthew, Mark, and Luke—the Synoptic Gospels. It covers the background, purposes, and geography of the Gospels. Throughout this verse by verse approach we emphasize the context of Christ's teachings and miracles. The content is arranged by a principle-centered method, which enables students to apply, preach, and teach these great timeless, cross-cultural truths.

  • (BIB152) Principles of Biblical Interpretation

    This course is divided into four units. The first unit presents fundamental truths that must be accepted before beginning a study of the Bible. The second unit deals with general principles of interpretation that are applicable to any type of literature. Specific rules that apply to special types of literature are overviewed in the third unit. In the final unit, the student is given sample passages of Scripture to which he or she will apply the guidelines of interpretation that have been learned.

  • (BIB153) Principles of Biblical Interpretation

    This course is divided into four units. The first unit presents fundamental truths that must be accepted before beginning a study of the Bible. The second unit deals with general principles of interpretation that are applicable to any type of literature. Specific rules that apply to special types of literature are overviewed in the third unit. In the final unit, the student is given sample passages of Scripture to which he or she will apply the guidelines of interpretation that have been learned.

  • (COM112) Public Speaking

    This course is designed to increase the student’s awareness of the importance of speech in all areas of life and human cultures. Its main emphasis is on the values of Christian ministry through speech. The units of the course deal successively with speech and the speaker, resources available to the speaker, the speaker and his or her audience, and intercultural aspects of speech.

  • (ENG112) Introductory Writing

    Introductory Writing presents rules for the standard or acceptable use of the English language, especially in written form. This course introduces basic writing principles and examines the fundamentals of language such as parts of speech, sentence structure, usage, and punctuation. In addition, it explains the writing process, techniques of organization and development, and basic documentation.

  • (ENG113) Introductory Writing

  • (ENG122) English Comp with Form and Style

    This English course follows the Introductory English course (ENG112) in normal sequence. English Composition shows how an author’s point of view and choice of language determine style and influence the meaning of written communication. The course also covers more advanced grammatical principles and the application of sentence structure to improve written communication depending on one’s purpose of narration, description, explanation, or persuasion. Special topics include academic outlining and an orientation to research and report, and summary writing. Form and style from GU is included in this course.

  • (HIS112) History of the AG

    This course deals with the origin, history, and development of the Assemblies of God in the USA and its expansion worldwide. It seeks to place the unique role of this Pentecostal church in perspective with the church universal. Special attention is given to the founders, trends, issues, revivals, and various programs of the movement throughout its history. Local AG history is to constitute one-fourth to one-third of the content of this course.

  • (ITE112) Information Technology I

    This course covers the essential knowledge necessary to begin using computers as tools in personal ministry and in the church. It introduces the value of computer technology and shows the relationship between the various components of the typical computer system, describing the basic operation of computers and important software. Students are encouraged to consider how they might use computers to enhance their effectiveness in ministry, whether in the church or in other areas. Finally, the course discusses the impact of rapidly changing technology on society and culture.

  • (LIT111) Old Testament Literature CRA

  • (LIT111) New Testament Literature CRA

  • (LIT112) Old Testament Literature

    This introduction and overview of the 39 books of the Old Testament explores the importance, structure, and canon of the Old Testament. The study examines book by book: the author, readers, date, literary style, context outline, theme, purpose, key passages, and principles for today.

  • (LIT113) Old Testament Literature

  • (LIT122) New Testament Literature

    This introduction and overview of 27 books explores the canon, historical background, and geography of the New Testament. The study examines book by book: the author, readers, date, literary style, context, outline, theme, purpose, and key passages. It emphasizes principles for living, and Jesus Christ and His Church as unifying themes.

  • (LIT123) New Testament Literature

    This introduction and overview of 27 books explores the canon, historical background, and geography of the New Testament. The study examines book by book: the author, readers, date, literary style, context, outline, theme, purpose, and key passages. It emphasizes principles for living, and Jesus Christ and His Church as unifying themes.

  • (MIN112) Spiritual Formation

    The premise of Spiritual Formation is that Christian leadership must lead first from Christ-like character and spirituality before skill. Spiritual formation comes from cooperating with the Holy Spirit, particularly through intentional spiritual habits that improve character and healthy responses to God’s direction and power. This course emphasizes six habits or disciplines: forgiveness (receiving and giving), daily prayer (petition, intercession, worship), daily Bible study (read, meditate, memorize), fellowship (healthy relationships and corporate spirituality), vision (evangelism, mission), and giving (Lordship of Christ). The student will learn tools and methods (a daily prayer journal during the course) that assist in developing these habits.

  • (MIN122) Evangelism Today

  • (MIN132) Children’s Ministries

    This is an A to Z study of why and how to minister to children. Focus on contrasting the structure and ministries of Sunday school and children’s church is considered. Then guidelines for curriculum, classrooms, methods of evangelism and discipleship, good communication, creative teaching methods, discipline, and a team for children's ministry to bless the whole church are presented.

  • (MIN142) Great Commission Strategies

    This course establishes a biblical theology of the Great Commission. It presents an in-depth study of evangelism and discipleship principles that are universal in their application. Important elements of Great Commission Strategies include the nature of the gospel message, the biblical definition of discipleship, and the methodology of Jesus. Challenges facing the church in multiple ministry contexts are also explored. Finally, the course integrates evangelism and discipleship, presenting them as two sides of a single task. (This course parallels and has replaced Evangelism Today. Students who successfully completed Evangelism Today cannot enroll in and receive credit for the Great Commission Strategies course).

  • (MUS112) Introduction to Church Music

    Introduction to Church Music begins with a study of the basic purposes of church music, forming the foundation of a biblical philosophy that can guide its proper use. Much of the course material deals with the function of music in church practice and outreach, as well as the organization of instrumental and choral ensembles. The goal of church music is to minister—to communicate, to touch people’s hearts, to instruct, to enrich and edify, and to enhance Christian worship and godly living. The course discusses the challenge of evaluating church music and considers the responsibilities and concerns of church music leadership. It is intended to provide an improved comprehension of church music ministries, broad and clear insight of the spiritual objectives of church music, and practical help in reaching these objectives.

  • (BIB212) Acts of the Holy Spirit

    This is a thorough study of the content, purposes, principles, and applications of Acts. Emphasize is placed on the role of the Holy Spirit then and now. Attention is given to the geographical, numerical, cultural, and theological growth of the Church from Jerusalem to Rome. The journeys of Paul are examined as the background of his epistles.

  • (BIB222) Pastoral Epistles

    This course is a basic study of the Epistles of 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus that describes God’s strategy for a healthy church. The student will learn about the personal life and duties of a pastor in finding and preparing leaders for service in the church. The student will study the various subgroups within a congregation and how to recognize and deal with error. Finally, the student will consider the essential nature of the gospel of Jesus Christ.

  • (HIS212) Civilizations Past & Present I

    This course traces the rise of both western and eastern civilizations from their preliterate beginnings. Consideration is given to the development of civilization in China, India, the Greco-Roman world, Eastern Europe, and Russia. The student becomes acquainted with the rise of Islam and the beginnings of civilization in Africa, Europe, and the Americas. This foundation leads to an understanding of states and political systems. As the history of world civilization is developed, a number of global issues are considered, including migration, religion and government, location and identity, and technological exchange. This course concludes with a review of the scientific revolution and the Enlightenment.

  • (HIS2202) The Church: Pentecost to Reformation

  • (HIS222) Civilizations Past & Present II

    This course continues the study of world civilization from the time of the French political revolution and the Copernican scientific revolution. Consideration is given to the rise of eastern and western states and the development of modern nations. The student will witness early attempts to establish democratic governments and the formation of bipolar world that has continued through the twentieth century. Global issues include slavery, gender, world war, and international law. This course concludes with a review of world governance.

  • (HIS2302) The Church: From Reformation through the 20th Century

  • (HIS232) Church History I

    This is an introductory study of Christianity from its birth to the beginnings of the Reformation. The course provides an introduction to history as a scientific discipline and emphasizes the importance of history in relation to the Christian faith. The course deals with the apostolic church, the early church fathers, the ecumenical councils, the emergence of medieval theology and church practice, and the beginning of the Renaissance in Europe. Course content includes a consideration of the contribution of major Christian theologians, the relationship of the church and state, and the rise of monasticism and missions.

  • (ITE212) Information Technology 2

    This course covers knowledge necessary to use computers in the classroom, stewardship, and research. ITII takes the student from computer application to classroom integration of PowerPoint and biblical software to managing monetary accounts to research techniques. Overall purpose is to learn how to make computers work for you.

  • (MIN212) Pastoral Ministries

    Focus is on the ministry of the pastor in three areas: Preparation call, devotional life, and personal life; Responsibilities preaching and teaching, worship, pastoral care, leading, training, forming cell groups, and special services; and Relationships with lay leaders, team, work, and calling.

  • (MIN222) Homiletics

    This course is designed to teach pastors, evangelists, missionaries, teachers, and lay persons a Five Step Method to prepare expository sermons. Students learn to develop the problem and solution parts of the sermon by stating a principle, and then explaining, illustrating, and applying it. Illustrations are emphasized to move truth from the head to the heart.

  • (MIN232) Expository Preaching

    This is a practical course in the methodology of preaching that emphasizes the step-by-step process of constructing expository sermons. The author includes a brief treatment of basic types of sermons, procedures for building expository sermons, the analysis and exposition of Scripture passages, and the building of a preaching program. The students build sermons for their pulpit ministry from the Gospel of Matthew and 1 Corinthians.

  • (MIN252) Human Relations

    Human Relations involves an analysis and application of the commandments given by the Lord in Matthew 22:34–40. The theme is love as typified by the Greek word agape. In this course the author examines the agape concept thoroughly and applies it to every kind of human relationship. Based on a biblical model, this course focuses on practical applications for individuals in all of their relationships: with God, with others, and with themselves.

  • (MIN262) Christian Counseling

    Christian Counseling is a paraprofessional approach to Christian counseling. Humankind is viewed as the creation of God with a capacity to know Him and have fellowship with Him. In Christian Counseling the students gain an understanding of the agape theory approach to counseling. This helps them follow Christ’s command to love one another. This course is not a theoretical approach; rather, it is a means to practical Christian counseling.

  • (MIN262) Christian Counseling

  • (MIS232) Modern Cults

    The doctrines of the most common modern cults will be reviewed. The teachings of Christian Science, Spiritism, Mormonism, and Jehovah’s Witnesses among others, are contrasted to orthodox theology. Scriptural refutation is offered, including the biblical plan of salvation and suggested soul winning techniques for evangelizing cult members.

  • (MIS242) History of Missions

    A study of the methods, principles, aims, and progress of Apostolic missions. Various periods of the missionary endeavor through the rise of Islam, the Reformation, William Carey, and the period for modern missions are studied.

  • (MTH212) Mathematics

    A course studying the fundamentals of the arithmetic of whole numbers, fractions, and decimals. Topics include addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Students study percents, ratio and proportion, and solve equations.

  • (PSY212) Intro to Psychology

    This course traces the development of the science of psychology to the beginning of the twenty-first century. Students will learn the basic scientific principles and methodologies of psychology from a Christian perspective. This interpretive study of psychology enhances the student’s understanding of intrinsic values, motivational responses, relationships, and other psychological concepts as they apply to all aspects of Christian life and service.

  • (REL2012) People and Their Beliefs

  • (THE212) Systematic Theology I

    The systematic study of the biblical doctrines of inspiration, God, trinity, and angels with appreciation of the history and development of Christian theology. Teaching on Scripture develops the case for its inspiration, authority, and infallibility as written revelation of God. Included are instructions on God’s attributes and angels as created spirit beings.

  • (THE213) Systematic Theology I

    The systematic study of the biblical doctrines of inspiration, God, trinity, and angels with appreciation of the history and development of Christian theology. Teaching on Scripture develops the case for its inspiration, authority, and infallibility as written revelation of God. Included are instructions on God’s attributes and angels as created spirit beings.

  • (THE213) God and Angels

  • (THE213) Systematic Theology I

    The systematic study of the biblical doctrines of inspiration, God, trinity, and angels with appreciation of the history and development of Christian theology. Teaching on Scripture develops the case for its inspiration, authority, and infallibility as written revelation of God. Included are instructions on God’s attributes and angels as created spirit beings.

  • (THE222) Lucan Pneumatology

    The systematic study of the biblical doctrines of creation, humanity, sin, Christ, salvation, and divine healing with appreciation of the history and development of Christian theology are considered.

  • (BIB312) Major Prophets

    The major prophets, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel, spoke God’s message to His people many years ago. Yet their message is as important for us today as it was then. In this course, the student gains an understanding of who these men were, why God called them to be His messengers, what their messages were, and how to apply these messages.

  • (BIB322) Romans & Galatians

    Paul’s Salvation Letters: Galatians and Romans gives the student a deep appreciation of the apostle Paul. In the midst of church planting, he explains the gospel, confronts false teachers, distinguishes between law and grace, and shows how the gospel is rooted in Old Testament Scripture. His systematic explanation of the gospel to the Romans gives the student insight into the major doctrines of sin, salvation, and sanctification. The student also learns how union with Christ and the indwelling Holy Spirit enable him or her to mature spiritually and live victoriously.

  • (BIB332) Wisdom Literature

    This course introduces the student to the ancient pursuit of wisdom, both in Israel and among her neighbors, and the genre, content, and social context of the wisdom writings. The course examines Old Testament wisdom books and wisdom writings produced in the period between the Testaments. Attention is given to themes that run throughout the wisdom tradition and the ways these themes develop and change in successive wisdom writings. The course also considers the ways wisdom writings helped shape the New Testament and continue to influence the church today.

  • (BIB342 ) Prison Epistles

    Analysis of Colossians, Ephesians, Philippians, and Philemon, all written while the author was in chains. Attention will focus on the light these letters shed on Paul's life and thought, as well as on the challenge of their message, and to the relation of Christ to the Church.

  • (EDU312) Principles of Teaching

    This course presents a Christian philosophy of education based on the concepts implied in Luke 2:52: “Jesus grew in wisdom and stature, and in favor with God and men.” The first unit deals primarily with the characteristics and needs of students at different ages and considers ways Christian teachers can meet these needs. The second unit looks into the fundamental responsibilities of the teacher and how to fulfill them. Unit three provides practical help in the use of contemporary educational methods. The last unit presents the steps in preparing, presenting, and evaluating lessons.

  • (EDU322) Competency and Proficiency in Teaching

    This course provides practical instruction on effective teaching techniques. The course begins by emphasizing the need for transformational teaching in which students actually live what they have learned. In this course the student will learn what transformational teaching is and how it differs from traditional methods. The student will discover how the brain learns and the strategies needed to help students not only retain information but also use it in their everyday lives. The course takes the student step-by-step through the process of writing learning objectives, course descriptions, lesson plans, and syllabi. Then it helps the student use those tools in the classroom.

  • (EDU323) Competency and Proficiency in Teaching

    This course provides practical instruction on effective teaching techniques. The course begins by emphasizing the need for transformational teaching - teaching in which students actually live what they have learned. In this course the student will learn what transformational teaching is and how it differs from traditional methods. The student will discover how the brain learns and the strategies needed to help students not only retain information but also use it in their everyday lives. The course takes the student step-by-step through the process of writing learning objectives, course descriptions, lesson plans, and syllabi. Then it helps the student use those tools in the classroom.

  • (HIS312) Church History II

    This course provides an introductory study of the history of Christianity from the Reformation, in the sixteenth century, to the present day. The student will consider renewal periods, organizational matters, theological issues, and geographic expansion. The student will also examine the lives and contributions of significant Christian preachers, leaders, and theologians, concluding with an assessment of current trends such as the charismatic renewal and non-Western missionary outreach. The lessons are structured to enable the student to apply insights learned from the past to contemporary situations.

  • (HSC312) Foundations for Health

    This course is a study of the principles of health and hygiene. With the theme of illness prevention, it examines nutritional needs, immunizations, environmental hygiene, and other methods of disease control. The course focuses on practical methods for protecting health, such as safety in the home, safe care during pregnancy and childbirth, and water purification. It also stresses how to recognize symptoms of many common ailments and how to treat these problems to prevent further sickness or complications. The course concludes with instructions on basic first aid for emergency situations.

  • (MIN302) Worship of God

  • (MIN302) Worship of God

  • (MIN302) Worship of God

  • (MIN302) Worship of God

  • (MIN312) Church Education

    Pastors or those responsible for the educational program in the local church will find The Church’s Educational Task a valuable course. It examines what the Bible has to say about such concepts as teaching, training, and religious instruction. In general, the course discusses the church’s role and responsibility to train and instruct its members and families in the Word of God.

  • (MIN322) Youth Ministries

    This course is an introduction to youth ministry through the local church and parachurch organizations. Students gain a working knowledge of youth ministry philosophies, strategies, and programming models. Students also investigate theological principles that undergird youth ministry development and strategy.

  • (MIN332) Ministry Internship

    This course requires each student to work with a local pastor in a local church. The student will have opportunity to apply and integrate academic studies through exposure to a well-rounded overview of the ministries of a church and the work of a pastor through observation, experience, and directed readings. Specifics of the internship plan will be worked out by the assigned Bible school mentor and the local pastor who jointly supervise and monitor the student’s progress.

  • (MIN342) Ministerial Ethics

    Historical as well as current moral/ethical issues and the ethical aspects of major Pentecostal doctrines are outlined. Guidelines for proper relationships with the congregation and with fellow ministers are highlighted. The course concludes with the practical application of ethics to the minister’s home life and ministry.

  • (MIN352) Pastoral Counseling

    Most students have noticed that people around them have emotional, spiritual, economic, and physical problems. Even the most persuasive sermon may not be heard by someone with serious personal problems. The Christian student, layperson, pastor, or religious worker must find ways to help people with their problems. This course looks at the different perspectives from which pastoral counseling may be seen. It emphasizes the necessary steps in preparing to become a pastoral counselor and gives attention to legal and practical ramifications of counseling. It also examines some of the issues faced by the pastoral counselor, seeking to find a balance between the clinical and spiritual, with the Bible as the final authority. This course investigates some of the current approaches to counseling and sets guidelines for counseling settings and sessions.

  • (MIS322) Introduction to Islam

    This course is an introductory study of Islam, including its beliefs, practices, and present status as a world religion. The history of Islam is summarized, and key terms are defined. In the final unit, the author contrasts key beliefs of Islam with Christianity and offers practical guidelines for effective Christian witness to Muslims.

  • (MIS332) Marriage Counseling: A Cross-Cultural Approach

    Marital distress is universal. This course attempts to address the void of pastoral training in marriage counseling. Founded on God’s Word, it begins by looking at a model of lasting change based on a biblical theology. It examines key biblical passages to establish a clear understanding of God’s purpose for Christian marriage and presents a biblical-practical-motive model of marriage counseling. Marriage illustrations from various cultures help show how the biblical model can be a powerful tool.

  • (PHL312) World Religions

    After the introduction to the concept of religion, the course surveys ten of the prominent living religions of the world: animism of the Third World and religions of India (Hinduism and Sikhism), of East Asia (Taoism, Confucianism, Buddhism, and Shintoism), and of the Middle East (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam). The course treats the origins, development, tenents, and literature of each and evaluates each in the light of Christian concepts. The course concludes with an analysis of the departure of heretical sects from orthodox Christian principles.

  • (SOS312) Marriage & Family

    This is a practical survey of marriage and family, from dating to being a grandparent. We explore: ways to choose a mate, guidelines for the engagement and wedding, communication principles, sexual fulfillment, making decisions, how to be a good spouse and parent, tough issues, and the final years.

  • (SOS322) Biblical Perspective of Social Concerns (special/PM)

  • (THE312) Systematic Theology III

    The systematic study of the biblical doctrines of the Holy Spirit, the Church, and last things with appreciation of the history and development of Christian theology are considered.

  • (THE322) Biblical Theology of Prayer

    This is a study of the great prayers of the Bible and the lessons that can be learned for our prayer ministry today. The course stresses the importance of and impact of prayer in contemporary life and encourages students to pray regularly and fervently.

  • (BIB422) Daniel/Revelation

    This is a study of the historical setting, symbolism, and meaning of the last book of the Bible. Related passages in Daniel and other biblical books are explored, interpreted, and integrated. There is a pastoral focus of understanding, illustrating, and applying the timeless scriptural truths of this prophetic book.

  • (BIB423) John’s Gospel and Letters

    The author examines the life, character, and ministry of Jesus Christ. This examination includes not only the historical context but also the divine perspective presented by John the Evangelist. The study of this course increases the student’s understanding of John’s Gospel and the Letters and aids her or him in there interpretation.

  • (BIB432) Corinthians

  • (BIB433) The Corinthian Letters

    How does one relate the Bible to contemporary church life? In the Corinthians Study Guide, the author helps the student do this through as in-depth study of these letters. He begins with exegesis, teaching the student how to use this method of Bible study to understand the problems faced by first-century Corinthian believers. Then, for each major problem the apostle Paul dealt with, the author suggests a possible solution or an interpretation that can be applied to the church today. This course is especially helpful to those who wish to preach and teach as it demonstrates a methodology of Bible interpretation. An overview of this course is also included in this study.

  • (BIB452) Hebrews

    A Study in the Book of Hebrews uses both analytical and topical studies to develop the main themes in the Epistle to the Hebrews. An introductory study of the structure of the book helps the student see more clearly its relationship to the Old Testament and the pattern of its development. Historical information on the background of the book gives an understanding of its warnings and exhortations. Numerous charts and outlines emphasize the main truths of the Epistle and are of great value to those who wish to preach or teach from Hebrews.

  • (BIB453) Hebrews

    Independent Study

  • (BIB473) Genesis

  • (COM453) Cross-Cultural Communications

    How do cultural differences affect the way people interact? How might one improve his or her communication skills in a shrinking world? Cross-Cultural Communications attempts to help the student discover answers to these current problems. Perhaps the most important aspect of this course relates to the word mission. The course is dedicated to helping the student become a sent one to present Christ and His kingdom in an environment other than his or her own. To do this, the course addresses how communication and culture relate, how to reach people where they are, how different people think and express ideas across cultures and subcultures, and how the thoughts and expressions of people affect their behavior.

  • (LDR412) Guidelines for Leadership

    The selection and development of Christian leaders is one of the major challenges the church faces. This course provides students with a contemporary theology of Christian leadership. It discusses leadership theory, presents servant-leadership as a model for Christian leaders, discusses biblical principles of leadership, and describes the major functions of leadership.

  • (LDR422) Managing Conflict

    This course is a study of the effective managing of conflict, particularly in the church. The course draws from a scriptural foundation with input from contemporary Christian and leadership literature. It begins by exploring the definition of conflict and its stages, emphasizing why managing conflict is a key part of a leader’s role in helping the church’s mission. Conflict is understood further by examining sources of conflict, communication, and approaches to conflict. A key part of the course includes scriptural perspectives on conflict from Jesus’ teaching and biblical case studies. The leader’s role in managing conflict is considered, beginning with the leader’s heart and moving to strategies for managing and reducing conflict, as well as how churches, organizations, and leaders can grow during conflict.

  • (MIN402) Forgiveness & Healing

    Together, we will be discovering an understandingof the Biblical teachings on Forgiveness and Healing. Attention is given to personal testimony and practical applications of forgiveness; and an understanding of the Doctrine of Divine Healing according to Scripture and the Assemblies of God doctrinal position with an emphasis on practical application of this doctrine.

  • (MIN452) Church Organization & Parliamentary Law

    (MIN452) Church Organization and Parliamentary Law The organization and administration of the church are considered. Subject considers church polity including presbyterial, congregational, and episcopal forms. Specific attention is given to the structure and organization of the Assemblies of God. In addition to the organization, parliamentary law is discussed and dramatized.

  • (MIN462) Church Planting

    This introductory course combnes the study of various cross-cultured church planting methods and will focus on generational, ethnic, and people group differences. Students will learn to contextualize ministry methods and models to match the needs and sensitivities of the people they are called to reach.

  • (MIS412) Missionary Principles & Practices

    This course introduces the student to modern methods in missions. The missionary policies and practices of the Assemblies of God are examined. Central to the course is a review of the indigenous church principles in governing, supporting, and perpetuating the church on the mission field. The course considers how a missionary candidate may raise funds, develop relationships, and work with her or his district and or General Council.

  • (MIS422) Ministry to Hindus

  • (SOS412) Cultural Anthropology

    This course is a study of the cultural values and differences of the various peoples of the world. The study seeks to develop an understanding of, and an appreciation for, the ways people of various cultural backgrounds perceive reality and relate to each other. Particular application is made on how these insights prepare individuals for cross-cultural living and ministry.

  • (SOS413) Cultural Anthropology

    (SOS412/3) Cultural Anthropology This course is a study of the cultural values and differences of the various peoples of the world. The study seeks to develop an understanding of, and an appreciation for, the ways people of various cultural backgrounds perceive reality and relate to each other. Particular application is made on how these insights prepare individuals for cross-cultural living and ministry.

  • (SOS422) Human Trafficking

  • (THE433) Old Testament Biblical Theology

    (THE433) Old Testament Biblical Theology In this course the Study Guide traces the development of major Old Testament doctrines. This study deals with what the Old Testament teaches about God, creation, humanity, sing, the Messiah, revelation, inspiration, angels, Satan, the various testaments and covenants, judgment, and life after death. It provides a wealth of material for preaching and teaching from the Old Testament.

  • (THE443) Pneumatology

    The person, work, gifts, and ministry of the Holy Spirit are the topics examined in this biblical study. Among the questions discussed from both the Old and New Testaments are these: Who is the Holy Spirit? What is the baptism of the Holy Spirit? How do I live a Spirit-filled life? Students are encouraged to apply these and other related biblical teachings to their own teaching and preaching ministries.

  • (THE453) Apologetics

    Is there a procedure for dealing with doubt? Can Scripture be verified? Are miracles possible? Where is history taking us? The author discusses these and other questions in Apologetics. Faith and knowing are the two consistent themes of this course. The Study Guide examines and explains the relationship between them. This course will help the student persuade others that there is no better way to follow than that of faith in, and obedience to, the God of the Christian Scriptures.

  • (THE462) Eschatology

    Eschatology is a study in the area of biblical teaching that concerns last things - the final outcome of the present order. The author addresses these teachings and gives a biblical picture of events. The second coming of Christ, the Tribulation, and the nature of predictive prophecy are among the topics discussed. As part of this course, the student also considers and analyzes a number of current eschatological systems.

  • (THE463) Biblical Theology of Mission

    This introductory course consists of an in-depth study of the mission Dei (mission of God), as revealed in the Old and New Testaments. To develop a global worldview of a biblical theology of mission and its application in the 21st Century, students will examine biblical texts that deal with mission, evangelism, and discipleship.

Graduate

  • (BIB5013) Historical Approach to Hermeneutics

    This historical treatment of biblical hermeneutics is designed to give students a perspective on the different ways in which the Bible has been interpreted in many times and cultures. Students will gain an appreciation of the role of dominant philosophical systems in providing a context for hermeneutical theory and insight into the presuppositions of the modern Western approach to hermeneutics. In addition, student will learn new criteria for judging inappropriate contemporary approaches to hermeneutics.

  • (BIB5033) The Bible as Literature

    One of the blessings of the literary approach to biblical study has been the recognition that the Bible contains many different genres or types of literature, including poetry, narratives, proverbs, visionary literature, and other genres. The literary features of these different genres are presented in this course, which provides students the opportunity to apply the techniques of literary criticism to these various genres of biblical texts.

  • (BIB5543) Foundations for Biblical Language

    This course provides a basic understanding of the structure and elements of biblical Hebrew and biblical Greek for those students who are not pursuing formal studies in either language. It will enable the student to develop advanced skills in using biblical language research tools in order to deepen their understanding of the biblical texts. This, in turn, will further enhance and advance the student's ministry to others.

  • (BNT5053) Colossians and Philipians

    This course is designed to aid students in developing a personal method of Bible study. The primary steps in exegesis will be presented by using as an example a study of the Epistle to the Colossians. Students will practice applying these same principles of exegetical methodology to the Epistle to the Philippians, analyzing Philippians from seven perspectives: semantics, syntax, immediate context, book context, theological (Bible) context, cultural/historical context, and literary context. After completing this exegetical analysis, students will be given an opportunity to contextualize their findings into a commentary and sermon.

  • (BNT5093) Letter to the Galatians

    Galatians is one of the most influential and difficult of Paul's letters. This course creates opportunities to delve into the social, cultural, and religious backgrounds that gave rise to the Galtian controversy to understand the opponents' "gospel," and to hear anew the significance o Paul's response.

  • (BNT5103) Letter to the Hebrews

    The Epistle to the Hebrews stands as a monument to early Christian reflection on the significance of the work of Jesus, His benefits, and the response of faith in the transition from the law of Moses to the gospel of grace. Students enrolled in this course will learn the exegetical techniques of rhetorical and cultural-anthropological analysis and apply them to a close reading of Hebrews.

  • (BNT5183) Acts as History and Theology

    Because ancient historical monographs typically illustrated lessons for life through the history they recounted, this course approaches the New Testament Book of Acts as both history and theology. The course will thus focus on both the history of earliest Christianity found in Acts and the Early Church and its leaders as models for subsequent Christian life and witness.

  • (BNT5313) New Testament Interpretation: Contemporary Approaches

    The analytical and critical techniques of modern biblical studies are explored in this methodological approach to New Testament interpretation. Topics to be treated include the authority of the Bible, the challenge of the New Hermeneutic, evangelical perpective of the so-called higher and lower critical approaches to exegesis, and the exposition of New Testament tests based on solid exegesis.

  • (BNT5573) Graduate Greek I

    This course presents a study of Koine Greek grammar and syntax with emphasis on reading and understanding the Greek text of both the New Testament and extrabiblical Koine literature. This study will help studets to appreciate the Koine Greek of the New Testament and to read Greek as it was written by Greek authors while avoiding the English syntactical approach. Requires supervised examinations that include translation of selected New Testament and/or extrabiblical passages.

  • (BNT5583) Graduate Greek II

    This course presents an ongoing study of Koine Greek that includes recognition and use of Koine Greek grammer and syntax that are necessary to translation and exegesis of the Greek text of the New Testament and extrabiblical writings. Requires supervised examinations that include translation of New Testament and extrabiblical passages.

  • (BOT5113) Science and the Bible

    This course explores the role of Christianity in the history of natural science on Christian beliefs. It relates scientific discoveries to the general revelation of God, referred to in this study guide as the book of nature, and to the special revelation of God, The Holy Bible. Recent scientific discoveries pointing to an intelligent Designer who created the universe are also considered. The role of reason in producing faith and confirming the revelation of God is examined and an appeal to apologetic witness is made.

  • (BOT5143) Isaiah: Major Themes

    This course addresses major themes in the Book of Isaiah and gives students the opportunity to utilize the exegetical process of biblical study in developing articles, lessons, sermons, or sermon series based on these themes, including applications to contemporary life in their own cultural context. Using selected passages from Isaiah, the course presents the four general themes of Judah’s sinfulness, God’s judgment for sin, Judah’s hope of restoration, and Judah’s messianic expectations.

  • (BOT5143)

  • (BOT5153) Hosea and Amos: An Exegetical Analysis

    This course moves chapter by chapter through the writings of two minor prophets, Hosea and Amos, to help students understand their messages to their people. The course also gives students the opportunity to utilize the exegetical process of biblical study in developing articles, lessons, sermons, or sermon series based on the major themes of these two books, including applications to contemporary life in their own cultural context.

  • (BOT5173) Poetry and Proverbs: The Psalms and Wisdom Literature

    The primary focus of this course is on Psalms, Song of Solomon, and Proverbs. Ecclesiastes is presented as a culminating masterpiece of poetry and proverb. The course follows a hermeneutical approach and deals with methods of interacting with biblical poetry and proverbs. The student is led to see the Bible as a continuously poetic and proverbial book, with poetry and proverbs embedded throughout, especially in the New Testament.

  • (EDU5023) Educational Measurement

    As and introduction to assessment of learning, this course covers the relationship of learning and assessment, including the design, development, and administration of tests and other assessment instruments and procedures. This course also covers test evaluation and grade assignments. A final chapter deals with interpreting standardized test scores. Specific topics included in course are: test specifications, item-writing strategies, test construction and administration, performance and portfolio assessment, item analysis, test evaluation, and grade reporting.

  • (EDU5043) Education in the Bible

    This course presents a study of educational institutions, activities, methods, agencies, and personalities throughout the Bible with the purpose of discovering distinctive biblical principles of education that may serve as touchstones for a Christian philosophy of education.

  • (EDU5053) Bible School Administration

    This course is a study of administrative philosophy, structure, planning, organization, management, educational standards and evaluation, and student development for Bible schools. The focus will be on gaining a broad understanding of the principles of educational administration that relate to the Bible school or advanced school of theology and application of the principles in the cultural context of the student.

  • (EDU5063) Curriculum and Instructional Design

    This course addresses the issues and technilogies involved in planning, developing, and implementing Christian and secular curriculum in secondary and post-secondary education and training. The student will be introduced to new ways of thinking about and practicing a technology of learning and teaching that have the potential to improve effectiveness in teaching and lead to improved learning for those being taught. As part of the study of curriculum development, special attention will be paid to the instructional design process and to the educational technology of distance education.

  • (LDR5013) Foundations for Christian Leadership

    This course presents a study of the role and character of Christian leadership. Attention is given to the spiritual life of a leader, the development of vision, and the translation of vision into contextually-appropriate ministry. Students will have the opportunity to explore their awareness of personal leadership skills and styles as these relate to involvement in leadership in a local context.

  • (LDR5023) Leadership Emergence Patterns

    This course presents a contextual study of the patterns by which leadership emerges. Attention will be given both to studies of generalized leadership emergence patterns and contextual patterns as they are affected by cultural priorities and models relating to leadership. Appropriate profiles of leadership emergence patterns will be studied and a personal profile will be developed.

  • (LDR5043) Conflict Management

    This course examines change and conflict within church congregations and organizations. It emphasizes the importance of understanding the relationship between organizational structures and cultural environment and how this affects the management of conflict when it occurs. Students will be enabled to explore their own conflict management style, interpersonal skills, decision-making abilities, and motivations as church leaders. Emphasis is placed on the value of a theology of conflict for effective church leadership and unity.

  • (LDR5053) Leadership Training Models

    This course presents a contextual study of the patterns by which leadership emerges. Attention will be given both to studies of generalized leadership emergence patterns and contextual patterns as they are affected by cultural priorities and models relating to leadership. Appropriate profiles of leadership emergence patterns will be studied and a personal profile will be developed.

  • (LDR5063) Leadership Research

    This course is designed to help students with the evaluative processes necessary to gain a contextual understanding of the leadership dynamics present in their own cultural/ministerial context. Attention will be given to evaluation and design of structures and processes for leadership development appropriate to the student's cultural/ministerial setting.

  • (LDR5083) Biblical Theology of Leadership

  • (MIN5013) Preaching to Change Lives

    This course on the methodology of sermon preparation guides the student in integrating exegesis of a passage of Scripture with literary analysis, rhetoric, dramatic technique, and analysis of the contemporary world for the purpose of preaching powerful and effective sermons that are true to the biblical text.

  • (MIN5203) Foundations for Pastoral Theology

    This course presents an integrated approach to both the character and role of the pastor of a local congregation. Emphasis is placed on the divine call and the biblical qualifications of a pastor in relation to the development of a personal biblical theology of pastoral ministry. Pastoral expectations and responsibilities are examined with specific attention given to the preparation of special services, including water baptism, communion, weddings, funerals, and dedications.

  • (MIN5223) Pastoral Counseling

    This course explores the biblical foundations for and the importance of the pastor in counseling. Common approaches and principles of effective counseling are presented and illustrated through case studies. The course provides a framework within which students may develop their own philosophy and strategy for counseling.

  • (MIN5233) Pastoral Ethics: Confronting Ethical Issues

    This course emphasizes biblical teaching as the foundation for all major ethical issues regardless of culture. It is designed to enable the ministerial student to remain culturally relevent, yet true to the Bible, when confronting international cultures and variant teachings. Multiple critical issues that are common in changing cultural will be examined in depth, based on the conviction of the central role of the Bible, even in a contemporary setting.

  • (MIN5263) Marriage and Family Counseling

    This course addresses the connection between a person's worldview and his or her belief system and lifestyle. Students are encouraged to develop a Christian worldview in which they respond to the basic issues of life according to the intentions and actions of God. Emphasis is placed on a Christian worldview that begins with the transformation of heart and mind and leads to a passion to reach the nations both individuals and societies. Students examine the dynamics of spiritual formation in developing a Christian worldview and the important role the church fills in preparing people to fulfull God's plan.

  • (MIN5273) Developing a Christian Worldview

    This course addresses the connection between a person's worldview and his or her belief system and lifestyle. Students are encourages to develop a Christian Worldview in which they respond to the basic issues of life according to the intentions and actions of God. Emphasis is palced on a Christian worldview that begins with a transformation of heart and mind and leads to a pasison to reach the nations both individuals and societies.

  • (MIS5013) The Biblical Theology of Missions

    This course is a survey of the biblical themes of missio Dei and the kingdom of God, which are seen as the unifying concepts of the Bible and the primary vehicles for the biblical theology of missions. In addition to a consideration of the evangelistic mandate of the church, attention will be given to the biblical foundation for socio-humanitarian ministry. Students will be challenged to respond personally to the biblical theology of missions and to evaluate the church’s contemporary involvement in the missio Dei.

  • (MIS5033) Cultural Anthropology

    In addition to a presentation of the basic principles and categories of cultural anthropology, special attention is given to the role of applied anthropology in the missionary task and the anthropoligical principles most relevent to missionary practice.

  • (MIS5053) Missions from the Two-Thirds World: Issues and Models for the Emergent Church

    This course focuses on the developmental issues faced by missions from the two-thirds world. The mission of the people of God is presented with a scope far beyond that often envisioned in the historic quest for an indigenous church. The operation of a missions organization and the role of laypersons in contemporary missions are also emphasized. Students are challenged to activate their churches to fulfill the Great Commission.

  • (MIS5093) Trends and Current Issues in Misisons

    This course brings together insights on current missiological issues from assigned reading, collateral reading, and ministry experience with a view toward the appropriate application of significant principles. Current trends and issues are treated in the light of both the biblical background for missions and the present realities of today's world context. Attention is given to worldwide issues with a foucs on issues of significance to the non-western missionary.

  • (MIS5103) Paradigms for Pentecostal Missions

    This course provides a critical analysis of the role of the baptism in the Holy Spirit in the work of world missions today. It explores the historical roots of the doctrine of Spirit-baptism as taught in the classical Pentecostal denominations as well as the contemporary understandings of the baptism in the Holy Spirit as understood by Pentecostals, charismatics, Third Wavers, and non-Pentecostal evangelicals. Biblical and theological issues are also examined by looking into the Book of Acts to determine how Luke, the author, viewed Spirit-baptism in his or her own life and ministry.

  • (PTH5903) Practicum

    This field-based experience provides a supervised learning experience in an actual Christian ministry setting. Through a self-designed ministry project, the student is given oppertunities to apply proper hermeneutical and homiletical principles to preparation and delivery of textual and expository sermons and to reflect on his or her theology and practice of ministry environment.

  • (RES5023) Graduate Research and Writing: Principles and Practice

    This course is an introduction to the purposes, principles, and methods of research, including quantitative, qualitative, and theological research. The development of the graduate student as a critical thinker and effective writer is foundational to the course and is integrated into its various writing assignments. Emphasis is placed on how to analyze and synthesize the information gained through research and how to present the results in an academically acceptable format.

  • (RES5023) Graduate Research and Writing: Principles and Practice

  • (THE5013) Current Trends in International Theology

    This course provides a critical analysis of significant theological perspectives and personalities as witnessed in recent decades. It exploes the influences of culture on theology, the function of the Bible in contemporary theologies, the role of theology in the hermeneutical task, and the significance of these factors for doing theology in the student's own cultural context.

  • (BIB6293) Hermeneutics: God’s Message and Its Meaning

    In this course, general rules that apply to grammatical-historical interpretation will be presented and contrasted with other common systems of hermeneutics. Students are challenged to develop a system of biblical exegesis that adheres to basic rules of hermeneutics. To accomplish this, the student is required to demonstrate these principles in the exposition of selected passages. A secondary goal is to acquaint the student with unique factors that affect interpretation of major literature genres in the Bible. To achieve this, the student will practice interpreting within the genres of historical narrative, poetry, parables, and epistles.

  • (BIB6926) Thesis: Biblical Studies

    This course requires field-based research after identification of a problem of a practical nature relating to some phase of biblical studies or selection of a topic in the field of biblical studies for further research.

  • (BNT6043) Pneumatology in Lucan Literature

    Historically, the exegesis of Luke–Acts has tended to neglect the study of Luke’s particular pneumatology. When Luke’s pneumatology has been treated, the tendency has been to interpret it through the categories of Pauline theology. This course seeks to analyze the pneumatology of Luke strictly in terms of Luke’s own theological agenda and approach as these are revealed in Luke–Acts. The larger hermeneutical and theological consequences of this theme are explored in depth with a view to demonstrating the essentially Lucan character of modern Pentecostal pneumatology.

  • (BNT6203) Backgrounds to the New Testament: Cultural and Historical Context

    This course introduces the student to the major political, social, religious, and historical factors that shaped the culture in which Christ ministered and the church was formed. The student will study these factors chronologically from the intertestamental period until the closure of the biblical canon. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the exegetical applications of the cultural-historical context in interpreting the New Testament.

  • (BNT6303) The Gospels: An Expositional Application

    This course enables the student to create sound expositions of the Gospels that give proper consideration to their historical, literary, and theological aspects. Through exposure to the general field of gospel interpretation (instruction about the specific principles that should be applied to the biblical texts), the student is given opportunities to produce expositions that integrate the knowledge and skills acquired in the course and that reflect the correct exegesis of the original texts. The thorough examination of the texts of the four Gospels will equip the student to deal with portrayals of Jesus that differ from the view presented by the gospel writers.

  • (BNT6673) Intermediate Greek (Greek III)

    This course provides the student with a review of Greek grammar and an in-depth study of Greek syntax. It is designed to equip the student with translational and exegetical skills for in-depth study and analysis of the Greek New Testament. The student is given oppertunity to practice the use of the major linguistic tools, create word studies, and translate selected passages of the Greek New Testament. The student is also introduced to leading software that will assist him or her in the research of the Greek New Testament. Requires supervised examinations that include translation of New Testament and/or extrabiblical passage(s).

  • (BNT6683) Advanced Greek Language and Exegesis

    In this study, the student is guided through an intense linguistic and exegetical study of significant New Testament passages. This course builds upon exegetical methodology presented in Intermediate Greek. Through practice in translating and exegeting an extended section of the New Testament, the student is able to inductively learn the process, build a knowledge base of Koiné Greek grammatical and syntactical constructions, and increase his or her Greek vocabulary. May require one or more supervised examinations that include objective, translation, and exegesis components.

  • (BNT6903) Practicum: New Testament Studies

    Through a self-designed NewTestament studies preaching project, the student is given opportunities for reflection on his or her theology and practice of ministry within a typical ministry environment, such as a local church, a parachurch ministry, a mission trip, or a chirstian school.

  • (BNT6926) Thesis: New Testament Studies

    This course requires field-based research after identification of a problem of a practical nature relating to some phase of New Testament studies or selection of a topic in the field of New Testament studies for further research.

  • (BOT6233) Critical Issues in the Pentateuch

    This course approaches the five books of Moses in light of their historical backgrounds and literary presentation of theological themes. The course treats the doctrines of divine origin, original sin, salvation, the Abrahamic and Sinai covenants, holiness, the ceremonial laws, and the value of the rest of the laws of Moses to modern believers. Various approaches to exegesis of the Pentateuch will be analyzed including major higher critical methods, the documentary hypothesis, and the relation of the Pentateuch to contemporary pagan literature.

  • (BOT6926) Thesis: Old Testament Studies

    This course requies field-based research after identification of a problem of a practical nature relating to some phase of Old Testament studies or selection of a topic in the field of Old Testament studies for further research.

  • (EDU6073) Teaching Strategies: Facilitating Adult Education

    This course presents teaching methodology from a Christian perspective and deals with the fundamental responsibilites of the instructor in the classroom. The student will interact with modern educational methods that utilize various teaching/learning procedures, classroom management, optimum conditions for learning, cognitive and behavioral learning theories and information processing theories in view of the psychological basis and their advantages and disadvantages.

  • (EDU6203) Educational Psychology

    The course presents a study of theories of human learning, development, and motivation as they relate to the educational tasks of guiding and encouraging learning. The course emphasizes application of theories of educational psychology in a church or ministry context and how to integrate faith and learning through the use of critical thinking.

  • (EDU6926) Thesis: Education

    This course requires field-based research after identification of a problem of a practical nature relating to some phase of Christian education or selection of a topic relating to Christian education for further research.

  • (LDR6033) Dynamics of Christian Organizations

    This course presents a systematic examination of the dynamics present in Christian organizations with a view to understanding the relaitonship betweenorganizational structures and cultural context. The dynamics of organizational life will be exolored in light of intentional mission and ministry.

  • (LDR6903) Practicum: Leadership

    Through a self-designed leadership project, the student is given opportunities to reflect on, develop, and utilize decision-making strategies, interpersonal leadership relationships, and other aspects of ministerial administration within a typical ministry environment, such as a local church, a parachurch ministry, a mission trip, or a Christian school.

  • (LDR6926) Thesis: Leadership

    This course requires field-based research after identification of a problem of a practical nature relating to some phase of Christian leadership or selection of a topic relating to Christian leadership for further research.

  • (MIN6233) Ministerial Ethics: The Bible Confronts a Changing World

  • (MIN6503) Relationships for a Lifetime of Ministry

    This course presents an in-depth look at contributing factors that lead to departure from ministry. It requires students to evaluate the place of relationships as a key building block of sustainability. Consideration is given to insights shared by contributing writers from multiple disciples for maximizing ministry effectiveness through relationships with God, parishioners, denominational leadership, local church boards, the family, and the community

  • (MIN6513) Spiritual Formation

    This course is designed to renew and intensify the spiritual formation of the student. Emphasis is placed on strengthening and building on previously developed biblical spiritual methods for growth and maturity in relationship to God and others. The course structure leads the student to progressively renew and strengthen focus and dependency on Christ alone through Christ-centered character development.

  • (MIN6903) Practicum: Ministry

    This field based experience provides a supervised learning experience in an actual Christian ministry setting. Through a self-designed ministry project, the student is given oppertunities to apply proper hermeneutical and homiletical principles to preparation and delivery of textual and expository sermons and to reflect on his or her theology and practice of ministry within a typical ministry environment.

  • (MIN6926) Thesis: Ministerial Studies

    This course requires identification of a problem of a practical nature relating to some phase of ministerial studies or selesction of a topic relating to ministerial studies or selection of a topic relating to ministerial studies for further research.

  • (MIS6023) Strategies for Cross-Cultural Ministry

    This course is designed to enable the cross-cultural minister to appraise the socio-political and religious setting of any given culture in order to develop the strategies that are needed to establish an indigenous church in that culture. In relation to this goal, the course deals with the topics of church planting, cross-cultural communications, power encounters through spiritual warfare, theological training by extension, the multicultural congregation, adjustments of the missionary family, and the role of the church that sends workers into cross-cultural ministry.

  • (MIS6043) History of the Expansion of Christianity

    This is a survey of the expansion of Christianity from the first century to the present. Special attention is given to the role of forces at work in a secular history and within the church that contributed to the different stages of missionary effort in the church. Students will be given an opportunity to write an essay on the history of missions in their own country, place that history in the context of global missions history, and discuss the role of secular world trends and forces-at-work within the church that were relevant to the evangelization of their country.

  • (MIS6073) Islam and Animism: A Christian Perspective

    This course presents an overview of the primary beliefs characteristic of those with an animistic or Islamic culture worldview. These beliefs are compared and contrasted with the biblical Pentecostal worldview. The primary goal of the course is to enable the student to formulate a biblical philosophy of ministry to address the spiritual issues of each of these groups. A secondary goal is to challenge the student to devise a strategy for training Christians to understand, relate to, and evangelize people from these backgrounds.

  • (MIS6903) Practicum: Missions

    Through a self-designed missions or evangelistic outreach project, the student is given opportunities for reflection on his or her theology and practice of ministry within a typical mission environment in a setting, such as a local church, a parachurch ministry, a missions trip, or a Christian school.

  • (MIS6926) Thesis: Missions

    This course requires identification of a problem of a practical nature relating to some phase of Christian missions or selection of a topic relating to Christian mission for further research.

  • (RES6903) Practicum: Research

    Through a self-designed research project, the student is given opportunities for reflection on his or her theology and practice of ministry within a typical ministry environment in a setting, such as a local church. a parachurch ministry, a mission trip, or a Christian school.

  • (RES6913) Research Methodology

    This course is an introduction to the purposes, principles, and methods of research, including textual, qualitative, and quantitative research. Emphasis will be placed on how to analyze and synthesize the information gained through research and how to present the results in an acceptable academic format. students will be guided by their mentors in formulating potential thesis topics.

  • (RES6926) Thesis

    This course is an applied research project culminating in a final written thesis based on independent academic and field-based research after identification of a problem of a practical nature relating to some phase of Christian ministyr for further research. It requires students to research, organize, analyze, critically evaluate, interpret, propose a solution, and present a written thesis based on results and analysis research.

  • (THE6023) Old Testament Biblical Theology

    This course presents a study of key theological concepts and doctrines fo the Old Testament with attention to progressive steps in the divine revelation and the relationship of God to his people. The course focuses on covenant promises given to the patriarchs as the unifying theme of the Old Testament. This theme is developed diachronically through the entire Old Testament. Included in this study are important Old Testament themes of saving faith, the Messiah, the people of God, the role of the Law, the People of God, the role of the Law, the purpose of the sacrificial system, the doctrine of atonement, the relationship between the Law and faith, the kingdom of God, and the continuity and discontinuity between the Old and New Testaments.

  • (THE6053) Pauline Theology

    This course is a study of the theological contributions of Paul's writings. Special emphasis is placed on Paul's teaching on Christiology, justification, union with Christ, ethics, misisons, and eschatology. Each theme is examined from a biblical, theological perspective, considering the development of the doctrine within the literary and historical context of the epistle in which it is reflected.

  • (THE6083) Current Issues in Pneumatology

    This course will help the student assess traditional Pentecostal doctrinal positions in light of contemporary ideologies that are expressed in writings of the twenty-first century. Issues that will be examined from a biblical perspective include: expanding the definition of the Baptism o

  • (THE6083) Contemporary Issues in Pneumatology

    This course will help the student assess traditional Pentecostal doctrinal posistions in light of contemporary ideologies that are expressed in writings of the twenty-first century. Issues that will be examined from a biblical perpective include: expanding the definition of the Baptism of the Holy Spirit, ecumenism, and the eschatological impact on pneumatology.

  • (THE6093) Theology of the Holy Spirit in the Old Testament

    This course presents an in-depth examination of a comprehensive list of passages that deal specifically with the Holy Spirit and His work as revealed in the Old Testament. A conscious effort is made to present a biblical (rather than systematic) theology, though at times it will be thematic. Special care is taken to reveal the continuity of teaching on the Holy Spirit in the Old and New Testaments.

  • (THE6103) Theology of the Holy Spirit in the New Testament

    This course addresses a comprehensive list of traditional Pentecostal teachings on the Holy Spirit as revealed in the New Testament. Particular attention is given to the writings of Luke, John, and Paul, providing a clear presentation of the differences in their approach and concerns regarding the one theme they present. Special care is taken to reveal the continuity in teaching concerning the Holy Spirit in the Old and New Testaments.

  • (THE6926) Thesis: Theology

    This course requires identification of a problem of a practical nature relating to some phase of Christian theology or selection of a topic relating to Christian theology for further research.

  • (BNT7503) Romans: An “Exegetical Analysis

    This course gives the student opportunity to explore, through expository and theological study of the original Greek text, Paul’s most important letter. The course provides an overview of such inquiries as authorship, date, purpose, circumstances of the writing of the letter, and the major themes of Pauline thought. The theology of the letter and its application to men and women living in the twenty-first century are emphasized. The successful completion of this course will require direct translation from the original language into modern English. A consideration of grammar, syntax, and context must be reflected in the translation and application of the text.

  • (Seminar) Church Planting

  • (Seminar) Pastoral Counseling Seminar